Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln - Daniel Day-Lewis

A still from Lincoln, directed by Steven Spielberg. (Photo: David James, SMPSP © 2012 DreamWorks II Distribution Co., LLC and Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved)

I finally had the chance to see the movie Lincoln (November and December get a bit crazy for me at church). It did not disappoint. After seeing Gangs of New York I became a Daniel Day-Lewis fan. My only disappointment with the movie was that I never noticed that it was Daniel Day-Lewis playing the role. He so absorbed himself into the part. (When he decided on the voice he would use he recorded it and sent a tape to Spielberg so that he would hear it first). While the voice caught myself and others off guard at first, it is most likely accurate according to what historians tell us. Day-Lewis described playing the role like this:

“I never, ever felt that depth of love for another human being that I never met. And that’s, I think, probably the effect that Lincoln has on most people that take the time to discover him… I wish he had stayed [with me] forever.”

On a personal note, one of the things that Lincoln says in a speech in the movie that I enjoyed: “I could write shorter sermons but when I get started I’m too lazy to stop.”

In hindsight, we look onto the wisdom of Lincoln and it stands far beyond what most people are capable in their lifetime. As Mary Todd Lincoln says in the movie to her husband, “No one has ever lived who knows better than you the proper placement of footfalls on treacherous paths.” May we learn to do the same.

Perhaps the quote that lingered with me the most was a conversation that Lincoln had about true north. He is discussing with Abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens on the wisest way to strategically achieve the end result that they want. When Stevens proposes an all-or-nothing type argument, Lincoln replies:

“The compass points you true north but does not warn you of obstacles and swamps along the way… If you can’t avoid the swamps, what good is true north?”

If you are looking for an entire overview of his life, or a play-by-play of the civil war… you’ll be disappointed. The story focuses primarily on the passage of the thirteenth amendment. If you are looking for an inspirational look at leadership and courage in the face of opposition then you’ll find few that can compare.

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Jeremy Jernigan

This is the personal blog of Jeremy Jernigan husband, father, executive pastor, and student of truth

5 Comments

Landon

about 2 years ago

http://coreyrobin.com/2012/11/25/steven-spielbergs-white-men-of-democracy/ Not a bad film. But thought I would give you a little perspective outside of all the gushing & starstruck nature of it. Thoughts?

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Jeremy Jernigan

about 2 years ago

I think your article puts an unnatural expectation on the movie. Remember, this isn't an objective retelling of history (as if that existed in the first place). This is storytelling. It is very natural for a story to focus on one person's perspective. Therefore, it should come as no shock to us that a movie called "Lincoln" would spend a disproportionate amount of focus on... Lincoln. While I don't disagree with the historical point the article is making I think we have to remember that this movie isn't called "The 13th Amendment." (To address his point about Schindler's list I'd make the same argument: that movie wasn't called "The Holocaust.") It's fine that he didn't like the movie but I think he needs to acknowledge his expectations and the fact that not everyone shares them.

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Landon

about 2 years ago

Touche. Not in disagreement with you. I liked the movie myself. Just thought it was interesting to look at the historical nature of the film as many will become convinced of the nature of its accuracy. I had just read the review so figured I'd send it your way.

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Jeremy Jernigan

about 2 years ago

LOL, I appreciate the conversation!

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Steve Crawford

about 2 years ago

I haven't seen it - i hear theres alot of G.D.'s taking the lords name in vain really bugs me i've always seen that as being the ULTIMATE disrespect for God, ( i'll compare to fingers on a chalkboard )even if it is only part of the dialogue. Also, i have found that what i was taught in school back in the sixties and seventies greatly differs from what is taught nowadays, especially when told by hollywood. Which is closer to accurate ? - i'm gonna go with the version which is told closer to the date of the actual occurence .

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