Life Posts

Thanks for the Feedback

Thanks for the Feedback - Douglas Stone, Sheila HeedI recently finished a great book called Thanks for the Feedback by┬áDouglas Stone and Sheila Heen. As the title suggests, it’s a book about how to best give and receive feedback. This is such a crucial, yet underrated skill. I live in a world of feedback for my job everyday. I’m constantly receiving bits of feedback on decisions I’ve made or someone has made on my team. The truth is that this can be exhausting. But the solution isn’t to run away while we cover our ears. We need feedback to grow, and regardless of what we spend the majority of our days doing we can find feedback all around us.

Here are some great ideas from the book for all of us regardless of whether you are in any type of corporate environment:

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The Responsibility for Your Incoming

"When you only listen to the top 40, you're letting the crowd decide what you hear. And if you consume nothing but the most liked, the most upvoted, the most viral, the most popular, you've abdicated responsibility for your incoming. Most people only read bestselling books. That's what makes them bestsellers, after all. Popular is not the same as important, or often, not the same as good."

Seth Godin
The Cure for Lifeless Christianity

The Cure for Lifeless Christianity

Last Sunday they printed my second article for the East Valley Tribune. I wrote about how we often think of our faith as passive despite the fact that the Bible uses very experiential language. It’s called “The Cure for Lifeless Christianity.”

Click here to read the article.

Digital Courage (Remixed)

In our world of computers and online conversations it is easy to say what you want with little regard to how it affects others. This is often referred to as “digital courage.” Many people say things behind a keyboard which they’d never dream of saying to someone’s face.

As a person who speaks on stage in front of people I’m often on the receiving end of someone’s digital courage. It can quickly be discouraging and less than objective to whatever it was which was actually said. While those are the examples that usually stand out to me personally, I’m also acutely aware how single-minded I can become when I’m writing about opinions of my own. The challenge before us all (and the continuous reminder) is to be the same person behind a keyboard that we are in person. For that matter, to be the same person regardless of the setting or situation.

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Little Things Matter

Little Things Matter

In a world of choices, the little things matter. It used to be that someone may not know the difference of the little things from one place to another. In our social media world everything is out in the open.

I’m not sure why my fast food experiences spur on so many blog ideas for me, but since I’ve already written about McDonald’s and Burger King, here’s a post about two more.

I don’t often eat at Whataburger, but my last experience stood out to me. My normal drive through routine is to ask for a packet of barbecue and ranch. Normally they silently grab a few and toss them in my bag. If you’re a regular at Whataburger, you know that’s not the case. I was told that I’d have to pay extra for each condiment I wanted.

Seriously?

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Embrace the End to Get the New

Embrace the End to Get the New

This weekend we had seventeen incredible Easter services at Central. It was extra special for our church since we were finishing a two and a half year series through the Gospel of Luke. Our creative element played with a stamp that said either “end,” or “new,” depending on which way you turned it. The point was that the end of the life of Christ offers us a new life in response.

I’ve continued to think about this idea. The hard reality is that we seldom like endings. They are painful and usually involve us admitting defeat or some sort of failure. For anyone trying to create something new or take a risk, endings are a part of the process. As Seth Godin says,

“If failure is not an option than neither is success.”

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